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to engage in serious negotiations. >> so, now what is the big question? speaker boehner will rebut the president just about 14 minutes from now. we'll take you there live. in his letter to his colleagues, he said his preference now is to work on a plan in the congress. but the president expects the house and the senate leaders of both parties at the white house saturday morning. is this just theater before a deal or a recipe for gridlock and maybe an economy shattering government default? chief white house correspondent jessi jessica yellin, and kate bolduan, and gloria borger here, jess, the speaker doesn't want to negotiate anymore, and this is not a president known for his anger or his temper, but he seemed pretty piqued. >> reporter: this was the president hitting by far his most frustrated, fed-up note during the debt negotiations by far, john. we heard him say that the republicans just don't know how to say yes. that he offered the most generous package he could. in short he said that he offered them a deal that democrats just didn't like. he was basically saying he was enrag
that and in exchange for some minor tweaking of medicare, but nothing that really gives the republicans too big a win on that issue. and they would also argue, to gloria's point earlier, that you actually need this. this is not just a win for democrats, you need it because you need democratic votes to get this through because you're going to lose so many republicans who simply won't vote to extend the debt ceiling under any circumstances. so that's the calculus if you went with the middle deal, there would be an entirely different math for a tax reform package if you went with that larger deal that's more in the $4 trillion range. >> the irony here to me is that a larger deal would in many ways be easier to cut because it's so obvious what you would have to do. if you do a smaller deal, then you have to have eric cantor lay out by piece by piece by piece, cut by cut, by cut, what he would do if you don't have the revenue side of it. >> but to get the bigger deal, you need trust that they would actually then do comprehensive tax reform, rewrite the code so the republicans would make the case we didn't
with the details. the president is talking and they are hoping for a big grand bargain. what is your sense? >> reporter: well, they have to get one done. so it's sort of the opposite of a cliff hanger. we know how it will end. the question is how do they get there from here? the big question first of all that i can report is that the president told congressional leaders that under no terms will he sign a short-term deal. he is not going to accept anything other than something that raises the debt ceiling through 2012 and that is flat out a promise. he was unequivocal. beyond that, the question over the next few days is, how do they get to this negotiation and all eyes are on john boehner, speaker boehner is the man who has to explain to them where he can get the votes, what it would take for them to deliver. and they are really looking to him. all the negotiators, to explain what the deal would look like for them to get on board with that. >> let's look at the tough choices that they have to make. if you have a grand deal, you have to have a number of things. maybe social security means if
tennessee. can they sell it to the house republicans? >> that's a big question. i think what we saw today both from president obama and someone like lamar alexander is this isolation that going on of the house republicans, saying, look, the gang of six got a deal, that's why president obama went out this to say it. mitch mcconnell's got a backup plan. john boehner and i were kind of working together and, well, who's out of that picture? the house republicans. and the polls are increasingly showing that the house republican point of view is not popular with the american public. i mean, there's a "washington post" out -- poll out tonight that says that more than three-quarters of americans see the republican leadership as being too resistant. >> however, however, let's listen as we go back to kate bolduan on the hill, the democrats are reading the polls. the democratic leadership going to the floor essentially saying, republicans, why are you wasting our time? >> the public has had it with this theater of the absurd that's going on. they want congress to come together as our president has s
out the president has a big birthday bash scheduled for august 3rd, celebrities flying in from all over. and lo and behold, august 2nd is the deadline for getting something done so that he can have this massive -- maybe the biggest fundraising dinner in history for a birthday celebration. >> and here's iowa congressman steve king. >> it's not default. they've been calling it default to try to stampede people into taking a bad deal here in this congress. the american people understand this. they understand at least intuitively that it would be the president who would willfully default if there's to be a default. i'd like to think the investor markets understand that, too. >> keeping them honest, there's little reason to think that's true. and plenty of people in the gop establishment and the business community sending up warning flairs. officials at the bond rating company standard & poors today briefing freshman republicans about what might happen. political reporting tonight they were cautioned that one possibility is "a death spiral in the bond market". s & p is already on record
just another decision to push big problems down the road? let's begin there with fareed zakaria. you would think the possibility that the united states would default on its obligations for the first time in history you would think would bring a grown-up conversation to washington, it would be that. but? >> it's truly bizarre, john, because what it seems that republicans are not focussing on is the fact that were the united states to default, were there to be a danger it would default, america's interests costs would go up dramatically. if we were to, say, have a 1% rise in our borrowing costs, that markets got scared that we were not going to make good on our payments and our borrowing costs went up 1%, that's $150 billion more that we have to spend every year on our interest payments on our debt. and this is very important. if we do this for a week or two and still resolve things once markets get scared, it takes a long time for those interest rates to come down. just look at any case in history where there has been a default. once you have a crisis, even if you settle your book, yo
news for the administration. here is the big question, where are the jobs? you see jobs started to go up in a better rate, but the last two months, very bleak. consider this, even if the economy added 125,000 jobs a month, 125,000 jobs a month, between now and the election next year, that would keep the unemployment rate flat lined, right around 9.2%. the president, if he wants the rate to go down needs dramatic improvement in the jobs climate and need it is quickly. one more here, pretty sobering if you look at it the government 14.1le million unemployed, half of them long term. add in those underemployed, people who can only find a part-time job, about 22.7 million people hurt and hurt badly by this economy. let's dig deeper, chief white house correspondent jessica yellin and in new york where traders on wall street literally gasped when the report was released. jess, to you first, hard enough for the president, facing re-election, the unemployment rate is stubborn in the middle of this, trying to get a deficit reduction deal. you have reaction to the jobs report, release this, this
rates go up. credit cards, mortgage rates, auto loan rates. you mentioned august 3rd, that big social security payment? according to many republicans, unless we default on an actual debt we don't have to get our debt downgraded. according to s & p and ben bernanke, if you default on any payment you're supposed to make, even if it's not to a bond holder you could face that. >> republicans who say, look, i don't buy it's this big catastrophe waiting to hit after august 2nd. >> reporter: they absolutely could be right. but anderson, you and i were together on september 15, 2008 after they decided a lot of smart people decided to let lehman brothers fail thinking it's not that big of a deal. i don't know which way it's going to go. i don't know if we should be playing with fire like this. >> john, what do you make of jessica's reporting that she's hearing mitch mcconnell is wanting president obama to be at the table in any negotiations? >> as a couple of political reasons for that in the sense that then you can't cut a deal then the white house will say we're going to try this. to move th
-ann, we haven't forgotten you. we're going to talk to you because it's your big day. we're going dom back after the break and we want you to watch this with us. we're going live now to new york city. that's where michael bloomberg is going to marry his aides after a break. i love that my daughter's part fish. but when she got asthma, all i could do was worry ! specialists, lots of doctors, lots of advice... and my hands were full. i couldn't sort through it all. with unitedhealthcare, it's different. we have access to great specialists, and our pediatrician gets all the information. everyone works as a team. and i only need to talk to one person about her care. we're more than 78,000 people looking out for 70 million americans. that's health in numbers. unitedhealthcare. [oinking] [hissing] [ding] announcer: cook foods to the right temperature using a food thermometer. 3,000 americans will die from food poisoning this year. check your steps at foodsafety.gov. >>> it's a fine and fancy day in the city of new york. i feel like i should be wearing my seersucker suit and drinking a mint julep
the c. and he appeared to be picking up the votes. lesson to shawn duffy. >> is this as big as we wanted to go? heck, no. we wanted to go bigger. we ran on going bigger. but this is the only proposal on the table that accomplishes the goals that we set out to do. >> progress but apparently and this is why we have such a drama unfolding on capitol hill, not enough progress. the speaker is still short the votes. he's delayed the key vote, a key vote to not only if you are sitting at home, maybe you think the debt ceiling should be raised, maybe you should, it's a fundamentally important political showdown, some people think the speaker's hold on his job could be in jeopardy if he loses this vote. let's go to kate bolduan, do they believe they can twist enough arms to get enough votes to pass this tonight? >> reporter: fabulous question this evening and one that is very hard to answer at this moment. i can tell you, let me just give you the lay of the land what you can probably see a little bit of, john, you were talking about the speaker's office, it's right down the hallway, what we're se
amendment? >> well, this has become a very big subject in the law professor world. the 14th amendment is one of the most familiar parts of the constitution, guarantees due process of law, equal protection of the law. but there is frankly a provision in section 4 that i have never paid any attention to before. and it goes like this. section 4 of the 14th amendment said "the validity of the public debt of the united states shall not be questioned". now, i don't know exactly what that means. i don't think anybody knows precisely what that means. but it has been suggested that under that provision, president obama could simply order that the debt be paid and that this crisis be forestalled. he has mostly reject that option, but as far as i've read their statements, they have not completely rejected that option. obama has always said, look, i think this should be dealt with by congress, not by unilaterally under the 14th amendment. but under my reading of their statements, they haven't completely ruled out in a total crisis situation invoking the section of the amendment and ordering the debt pai
or will this cause some bigger conversation? that's a big question. >> and earlier in the week, anderson, we were talking about whether the white house might possibly agree to some kind of a short-term patch of two to three days in order to get the negotiations really moving again. and i think, you know, as the clock ticks i think we have to look back to that scenario and wonder whether that's a possibility again. >> remember all that grand bargain big talk? doesn't that seem like 20 years ago? was that like two weeks ago? >> yeah. although if you talk to some democrats and jessica's been reporting that the white house is still talking about some kind of a grand bargain, right? so it seems like a long time ago. but funny how these things work, right? >> john, gloria thank you. i want to bring in two other perspectives now. on the left democratic strategyist cornell -- and former senate candidate mccain advisor and former hue let pack yard ceo, carly fiorina. carly, just in terms of the politics of, this how do you think republicans are looking at this in terms of the political who's going to get
. but i don't think anyone should be surprised. and they won pretty big. the question is, where l they compromise going forward. i had two republicans saying they don't want to vote for anything in the end that doesn't want to have a pass the balanced budget. to get the debt ceiling, you have to pass a balanced budget. this is too important of an issue. >> they want to vote on an amendment. and we need to have that and give them an opportunity to vote on a balanced budget amendment. and the reid cut does not -- there is more of a commitment to spending in the near term and a path way to get a retitlement with triggers to force action to get addition@savings. those are two things that have to be in there. and it's going to be fortunate get republican spoort. >> one of the political arguments and the arguments for anyone at home f you get a deal in the end there is talk that the ratings agencies will downgrade the credit rating because it's to messy. i want you to listen to the president. if you have a conservative, you don't want taxes as part of the deal. if the credit rating gets
this procedural vote to our viewers and what it means. the big vote still to come. >> wolf, they have something in the rules committee that allows members of congress to basically strike the last word if there's ame amendments and stuff that must go to it. this is a procedural vote. >> you used to work for the speaker of the house when he was newt gingrich. >> the motion is the minority party's shot at an alternative. it will be defeated by the majority. >> it's been really intense over these past 24 hours. it looked very gloomy for the speaker, john boehner. all of a sudden they sweetened the pot for the tea party supporters, freshman republicans, and now it looks like he's going to get this language passed. >> a guaranteed vote on the balanced budget amendment. i think that the speaker of the house would not even be bringing this up if he were not absolutely sure that he did not have the votes to pass it which is why he didn't bring it up yesterday. what's interesting about this is we watched for hours last night. people going in and out of his office. pizza being delivered and all the rest.
Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)